Friday, December 31, 2010

January 12, 2010 - Common Core Standards and Scholastic!

Email this Story
Free Webinar: Understanding the Common Core State Standards in ELA. Join Scholastic and Susan Gendron to learn more about the specific requirements of the standards and also receive an overview of Expert 21, a new English Language Arts curriculum that will help schools implement the standards in Grades 6-8. Click here to register today!

Monday, December 27, 2010

Blended Learning! Following is a great resource center for teachers! Enjoy:)


eSchool News Logo
Online Education Resource Center Of The Week:
The Many Faces of Blended Learning

Go to eSN Online today and:


Discover how blended learning boosts achievement
Uncover the educational goals in the National Broadband Plan
Learn why interest in hybrid courses are on the rise
Find out how NYC schools deploy free email and collaboration tools
ERC

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Using Skills Learned in Guided Inquiry Ups Chances for Employment.

Following is a article provided by e-school.  It touches on many of the strategies we embedded in our guided inquiry units:)

Project-based learning in the classroom 

With employers looking for graduates who can communicate effectively, think critically, and solve problems in collaboration with other team members, more and more schools are looking to project-based learning as a way to better prepare students for these demands. Besides helping students develop the same 21st-century skills that employers covet, project-based learning also helps students retain the information they learn, proponents of the approach say--and it engages students' interest and motivates them to learn.

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Librarian and Classroom Teacher Collaborate!

Information literacy is one of the most pertinent for the 21st century.

Information literacy requires student participation - the active searching/sorting/comprehending of information.


Ideally, the librarian and teacher team teach - a content area specialist and a media specialist.  This is the case in the Rumford Elementary school where Eileen Broderick is the librarian.


Every year she works with teachers to complete units on researching animals.




Interestingly enough, collaboration is equally important in the 21st century.  Teachers model this format and then students work in small groups.








This model can be used at any level.




Jacob Bogar, science teacher at Mt. Blue High School, takes a group of students to the school library to research in a guided inquiry unit.





Lisa Darymple collaborates with a technology instructor in her Spanish class where students are engaging in guided inquiry.


This type of reflection is key to processing the massive amount of information being presented to us through the global internet.


Guided inquiry requires active participation on the students' part and leads to engagement.

Engagement leads to rigor - a link teachers often overlook.

Following is a graphic that explains that illustrates the link between the two.  It was prepared by Dr. Valerie Dickerson.

Take a look.  These activities are easily embedded in classroom instruction.

Monday, November 29, 2010

Engaging Students through Online Collaboration


Here is an excellent article on online collaboration - the theme of this year's study by the literacy and technology committee.  Taken from eSchool News. Please read and comment.  We are interested in your thoughts.

With the help of technology, students in a growing number of classrooms are collaborating with their peers--both in their own schools and around the world--to solve problems and complete projects. Here are some examples.... [ Read More ]

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Read the latest from e-school news! Surprising Research!

eSchool News Presents...
eSN Special Report
Blended Learning on the Rise
Read this FREE special report and you'll:

  • Learn how blended learning combines the best elements of both face-to-face and online instruction
  • Discover new ways to motivate your students with technology in the classroom
  • Learn about a learning lab model and see if it's a good fit for your school
  • Find out why some experts believe blended learning is the future of education





Read this special report for FREE now at:
http://www.eschoolnews.com/2010/10/27/esn-special-reportblended-learning-on-the-rise
For many school reformers, blended learning is an exciting instructional model because it combines the best elements of both face-to-face and online instruction.
As technology advances and new digital tools become available to educators and students, a steady migration toward online learning has begun to take place. Many students who struggle in a traditional learning environment now have the opportunity to attend a "virtual" school, where they can learn at their own pace: Advanced students are not held back by the slower pace of their peers, while students with disabilities have more time to understand the material before moving on. Parents in rural communities who home-school their children because of the time and distance it takes to travel to the nearest brick-and-mortar school can have the support of a strong online curriculum. And students who have dropped out of school have the chance to resume their education, finish high school, and get a diploma via distance learning. Meanwhile, multimedia options give online learning an edge often not found in traditional learning environments.

Find out more about blended learning. Visit our special report available for FREE now at: http://www.eschoolnews.com/2010/10/27/esn-special-reportblended-learning-on-the-rise
Best regards,
   -- The Editors of eSchool News


Thursday, November 11, 2010

Great Article from eSchool News - Ten Steps for better media literacy skills.

eSchool News Logo

Ten steps for better media literacy skills

New action plan calls for educators, community leaders to promote media literacy education

By Meris Stansbury, Associate Editor

21st Century Education, Community, Curriculum, Featured on eSchool News, Top News, eClassroom News Nov 10th, 2010
Media literacy skills are used for more than just research papers.
As policy makers work to increase the number of U.S. households with broadband access, many are realizing it’s not enough for people to be able to access information online and through various media outlets; they also need the ability to analyze the information they find for accuracy and credibility—a 21st-century skill not every child or adult possesses.
A new white paper, “Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action,” by Renee Hobbs, founder of Temple University’s Media Education Lab, now gives policy makers and education leaders a detailed plan to boost media literacy skills in their communities.
“Existing paradigms in technology education must be shifted towards a focus on critical thinking and communication skills and away from ‘gee-whiz’ gaping over new technology tools,” Hobbs said. “An effective community education movement needs a shared vision. This report offers recommendations that involve many stakeholders, each participating in a way that supports the whole community.”
The need for action arises from other recent reports, such as a 2006 survey by Susannah Fox of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, which found that 75 percent of internet searchers “do not pay heed to the quality of information they find, and 25 percent reported becoming frustrated, confused, or overwhelmed by what they find.”
Another report, released in 2009 by the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy, assessed media literacy in communities and created 15 recommendations to better meet communities’ information needs.
After the release of the Knight Commission report, titled “Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age,” the Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation partnered to explore ways to implement its recommendations.
The Aspen Institute commissioned a series of white papers to help transform these recommendations into action—and Hobbs’ media literacy report is one such white paper (others include universal broadband, civic engagement, online hubs, and more).
According to Hobbs, knowing how to search for, analyze, and interpret information is a skill that will be used for more than just writing a good research paper: People use media literacy skills for applying for jobs online, getting relevant health information, and sifting through online educational opportunities, for example.
People also need media literacy skills to read or watch the news, write a letter to an editor, comment on an online news story, share ideas online, take an opinion poll, search for information on topics, or take community action.
Perhaps most importantly, media literacy skills are crucial in understanding and maintaining online safety, said Hobbs.
“We must consider the balance between protection and empowerment and respond seriously to the genuine risks associated with media and digital technology,” she explained.
Hobbs’ 10 recommendations for better media literacy skills

Support community-level digital and media literacy initiatives.
1. Map existing community resources and offer small grants to promote community partnerships to integrate digital and media literacy competencies into existing programs.
Pages: 1 2 3 Next page

Monday, November 8, 2010

Information Literacy and Communication Rubric


 During our last meeting on Friday, we talked a little bit about information literacy.  Following is a rubric created for Vancouver schools.  Take a look and see if you can use it:)
























Friday, November 5, 2010

Collaborating in Education

Collaboration Rubric



Name __________________________________


Beginning
1
Developing
2
Accomplished
3
Exemplary
4
Score
Contribute





Research & Gather Information
Does not collect any information that relates to the topic.
Collects very little information--some relates to the topic.
Collects some basic information--most relates to the topic.
Collects a great deal of information--all relates to the topic.

Share Information
Does not relay any information to teammates.
Relays very little information--some relates to the topic.
Relays some basic information--most relates to the topic.
Relays a great deal of information--all relates to the topic.

Be Punctual
Does not hand in any assignments.
Hands in most assignments late.
Hands in most assignments on time.
Hands in all assignments on time.

Take Responsibility





Fulfill Team Role's Duties
Does not perform any duties of assigned team role.
Performs very little duties.
Performs nearly all duties.
Performs all duties of assigned team role.

Participate in Science Conference
Does not speak during the science conference.
Either gives too little information or information which is irrelevant to topic.
Offers some information--most is relevant.
Offers a fair amount of important information--all is relevant.

Share Equally
Always relys on others to do the work.
Rarely does the assigned work--often needs reminding.
Usually does the assigned work--rarely needs reminding.
Always does the assigned work without having to be reminded.

Value Others' Viewpoints





Listen to Other Teammates
Is always talking--never allows anyone else to speak.
Usually doing most of the talking--rarely allows others to speak.
Listens, but sometimes talks too much.
Listens and speaks a fair amount.

Cooperate with Teammates
Usually argues with teammates.
Sometimes argues.
Rarely argues.
Never argues with teammates.

Make Fair Decisions
Usually wants to have things their way.
Often sides with friends instead of considering all views.
Usually considers all views.
Always helps team to reach a fair decision.












Total



Return to the Cabrillo Tidepool Study page.

Rubric - More info on preparing students for the 21st century.


GLOBAL AWARENESS


Definition:

Global awareness is the recognition and understanding of interrelationships among international organizations, nation states, public and private economic entities, socio-cultural groups, and individuals across the globe.


Quote:

“… the world's corporate and political leadership is undertaking a restructuring of global politics and economics that may prove as historically significant as any event since the Industrial Revolution. This restructuring is happening at tremendous speed...”

-International Forum on Globalization (http://www.ifg.org/)  Accessed 11-27-01




Importance in the Digital Age:

According to Thomas Friedman, author of the Lexus and the Olive Tree, globalization has replaced the Cold War in defining international relationships. Access to telecommunications and technology has caused shifts in power from nation states to multinational corporations, public and private economic entities, socio-cultural groups, and even individuals. 

Today, international commerce accounts for nearly a quarter of the American economy. A third of recent U.S. economic growth and a quarter of new job creation are due to exports. The world marketplace is even more important to particular sectors of the economy. One out of every two acres of wheat grown by American farmers is exported. More than two-fifths of the production of the domestic computer industry – including computer systems, hardware, and peripherals – is exported, and nearly three-fifths of the computer equipment Americans rely on is imported (Citizen’s Guide to U.S. Foreign Policy, 2000, pgs. 7-16).

But as U.N. Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, reminds us: “Unless the basic principles of equity and liberty are defended in the political arena and advanced as critical conditions for economic growth,” the rewards reaped from a global economy will be limited (speech at Harvard University, September 17th, 1998). Indeed, informed citizens worldwide are beginning to articulate wider principles, policies, and politics of “global awareness.” Central to these efforts is the belief that trade, investment, and technology are not ends in themselves; they are tools for promoting the ideals of equality, democracy, good jobs, a clean environment, and healthy communities.

The fair treatment of workers, the possible depletion of environmental resources, higher international health and safety standards, consumer protections, and issues of overpopulation, illiteracy, poverty, racism, hunger, aging, justice, immigration transcend national boundaries; they have become a growing part of our 21st century consciousness. Multinational flows of ideas, information, capital, labor, and even identity are concerns of the present that are not likely to diminish in an increasingly interconnected global future.

Communications technology, of course, is a tremendously important component of global awareness; the use of such technologies invariably informs our response to issues of globalization. According to John Naisbitt, “With the activities of the world being replayed for us in our living rooms each night, none of us can feign ignorance about affronts to society’s ethical standards. We have all become our brother’s keepers – at least in this sense. Communications technology has empowered individuals and communities through instant access to information of all kinds. With that access comes responsibility. Are we up to the task?” (Global Paradox, 1994, p.193).


Profile of a Globally Aware Student:

Globally aware students consider themselves global citizens. As such they use digital-age technologies to learn, think, participate in, and communicate about global issues. Globally aware students:

·       are aware of how technology links nations and individuals, as well as how it enables the global economy.
·       understand the interconnectedness of the global economy.
·       are aware of how the global economy impacts political decision-making – including the formal and informal pacts nations enter into.
·       are aware of the social, environmental, and micro-economic impacts of global decisions made by both national and international (e.g. the U.N., the I.M.F.) organizations.
·       understand how cultural differences (e.g. beliefs, traditions, religions) impact personal and national participation at the global level.
·       understand the impact of ideology and culture on national decisions about access to and use of technology.
·       participate in the global society through interactions with persons in another country or culture.


Continuum of Progress:

Indicator
Novice
Basic
Proficient
Advanced
Awareness of technology’s impact on interconnections between nations/ individuals, global economy
Student is unaware of the role that technology plays in enabling a global economy.  He/she knows at a very superficial level that technology links individuals from different nations.
Student is aware that technology plays an important role in linking nations/individuals and in enabling the global economy.  However, this knowledge is general, limited (e.g., student may define technology too narrowly), or includes significant misconceptions. 
Student has some understanding of the ways in which technology has been an essential part of the global economy.  He/she understands some of the effects technology has had in linking nations /individuals and enabling exchange of goods, services, and information.
Student understands - beyond grade-level expectations -how technology links nations/individuals, how it enables the global economy, and how it changes the nature of the resources (e.g. information vs. goods) that can be traded.
Understanding of the interconnected-ness of the global economy
Student does not understand that economies of nations impact one another.
Student is aware that national economies impact one another, but this knowledge is general and sparse.  
Student is aware that economic conditions of one nation can impact those of other nations, but he/she is not aware of political/social/ environmental issues raised by economic interdependence.
Student understands – beyond grade-level expectations – how economies impact each other; he/she can think critically about political/ social/ environmental issues raised by economic interdependence.
Understanding of the impact of global economy on political decision-making
Student is unaware of the impact of economic considerations on political decision-making.  He/she may be largely unaware of political events and international economic conditions.
Student is generally aware that political decisions are shaped by economic considerations; however, he/she has little knowledge of specific considerations and national/ international policies.
Student is aware of some of the economic considerations that drive political decisions.   However, this knowledge is somewhat limited or tends to cast issues in black and white terms.
Student possesses knowledge – beyond grade level expectations – of economic considerations that drive specific national policies and decisions.  He/she can critically evaluate the gains and losses that result from these policies.
Understanding the impact of decisions made by national, international organizations on societies, environment, economies

Student has no knowledge of the impacts of decisions made by national/international organizations.  He/she has little knowledge of these organizations or their functions.
Student understands very generally that national and international organizations impact societal, environmental, and micro-economic conditions, but is unaware of specific policies/decisions that impact his/her world.
Student understands how some specific decisions made by national/international organization impact many facets of his/her day-to-day world; however, knowledge is limited or tends to cast issues in black and white.
Student has an excellent understanding of the way specific decisions made by national/international organizations impact his/her day-to-day world.  He/she is able to evaluate these issues critically and thoroughly.
Understanding of the impact of culture on political relationships
Student is unaware of the ways in which culture impacts national/personal political decision-making.
Student understands that culture impacts national/personal political decision-making, but his/her view tends to cast these issues in black and white.  Knowledge is either sparse or includes significant misconceptions.
Student understands some specific ways in which culture impacts national/personal political decision-making. 
Student has an excellent understanding of the ways in which culture impacts decision-making of specific nations/groups.  This understanding is fair and takes into account multiple cultural perspectives.
Understanding of the impact of ideology, culture on decisions related to technology and access
Student is unaware of differences in societies’ access to technology and information; he/she is unaware that political ideologies and culture impact individuals’ access to these resources.
Student understands at a general level that nations differ in the degree to which they allow citizens access to technology/ information.  However, this knowledge is sparse.
Student understands some of the ideological and cultural issues that drive national decisions about access to technology and information.
Student has specific and well-developed knowledge of ways in which access to technology/information is impacted by culture and political ideology.  He/she is able to transfer this knowledge when learning about similar issues with which he/she is unfamiliar.
Participation in the global society

In many cases it has not occurred to the student that persons in other nations directly influence his/her life socially, politically, and economically.

The student has a growing awareness of the global nature of the world.  He/she is interested in the study of international policy and affairs—but action is limited to learning and reflection.

The student recognizes his/her own role as an individual in a global society.  As such he/she - when guided -participates locally through economic, political, or social means (e.g., donations to relief efforts, contributions to international social, health, or environmental concerns). 
The student is aware of how his/her actions and the actions of his/her country exert influence globally.  He/she   seeks to understand the global impact of personal actions (e.g., consumerism based on company policies, consumption of energy, or recycling), and acts accordingly.


References and Links:

Anderson, Sarah, John Cavanagh, Thea Lee, and the Institute for Policy Studies. Field Guide to the Global Economy. New York, NY: The New Press, 2000.

Annan, Kofi. Speech to Harvard University, September 17, 1998.

Castells, Manuel. The Rise of the Network Society. Oxford, U.K.: Blackwell, 1996.

Drucker, Peter (2001, November 3). The Next Society. The Economist, Special Supplement, pgs. 3-20

The Economist (2001). Pocket World in Figures, 2001 ed. London, U.K.: Profile Books

Foreign Policy Association (2000). Citizen’s Guide to U.S. Foreign Policy: The Critical Issues. NY: Foreign Policy Association

Friedman, Thomas L. (1999). The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization. NY: Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Friedman, Thomas L. (2001)Presentation to the Indiana Humanities Council.

Naisbitt, John (1994). Global Paradox. New York: Avon

Sassen, Saskia (1988). The Mobility of Labor and Capital. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press

Monday, October 25, 2010

Cultural Literacy in Action



On October 8, 2010 we held our 3rd class session.  We began by having a skype session with Bruce Ashton, elementary principal at Sinarmas World Academy.  Bruce has worked in a number of schools where they have used the IB curriculum, based on units of inquiry.  We were able to ask a number of questions that helped us clarify our plans for guided inquiry.  We are beginning to finalize our units and found this process extremely helpful. 

As an extension of this work, a subcommittee is working on the creation of a rubric - to be used by teachers and students - on collaborative reasoning.  
Following is a rubric - with references - on cultural literacy.  Take a look.  These pieces are necessary in the classroom:)

CULTURAL LITERACY


Definition:

Culturally literacy is the ability to understand and appreciate the similarities and differences in the customs, values, and beliefs of one’s own culture the cultures of others.


Quote:

“No culture can live, if it attempts to be exclusive.” 

-Mahatma Gandhi as cited on http://www.chesco.com/~artman/gandhi.html Accessed 11-26-01.

[Image]


Importance in the Digital Age:

As citizens of one of the most diverse nations in the world, it has been particularly important that Americans be sensitive to the role that culture plays in the behaviors, beliefs, and values of themselves and others.   The advent of new communications technology only makes this sensitivity more imperative.  Within the virtual worlds of e-mail, chat rooms, virtual classrooms, and even multi-player gaming environments, individuals from cultures and societies around the globe are interacting with a frequency that was unimaginable even a decade ago. 

In order to work cooperatively with individuals from vastly different backgrounds, students must appreciate and understand the beliefs and values that drive them.  These qualities must reflect a notion of cultural literacy that is broader than it has been in the past:  first, it must be sensitive to the many sub-cultures that exist within the larger American society; second, it must include newly developing technological cultures such as virtual workspaces, and chat-room environments; and third, it must recognize the evolutionary nature of culture and the impact that technology had had – and will continue to have – on cultures worldwide. 

Understanding other cultures has two notable benefits: 1) it multiplies our access to practices, ideas, and people that can make positive contributions to our own society; and 2) it helps us understand ourselves more deeply. By understanding a range of alternatives, we become aware of our own implicit beliefs – beliefs so deeply imbedded that we routinely take them for granted (Stigler, Gallimore and Hiebert, 2000).


Profile of a Culturally Literate Student:

Culturally literate students are knowledgeable and appreciative of the way that culture and history – their own as well as those of others – impact behaviors, beliefs, and relationships in a multicultural world.  Such students:

  • understand that culture impacts their behavior and beliefs, and the behavior and beliefs of others. 
  • are aware of specific cultural beliefs, values, and sensibilities that might affect the way that they and others think or behave.
  • appreciate and accept diverse beliefs, appearances, and lifestyles.
  • are aware that historical knowledge is constructed, and is therefore shaped by personal, political, and social forces.  
  • know the history of both mainstream and non-mainstream American cultures, and understand that these histories have an impact today.   
  • are able to take the perspective of non-mainstream groups when learning about historical events.
  • know about major historical events of other nations and understands that these events impact behaviors, beliefs, as well as relationships with others.
  • are aware of the similarities between groups of different cultural backgrounds and is acceptant of differences between them.
  • understand the dangers of stereotyping and other biases; are aware of and sensitive to issues of racism and prejudice.  
  • are bilingual or multilingual, or working towards these proficiencies.
  • can communicate, interact, and work positively with individuals from other cultural groups.
  • understand how the use of technology and the Internet impacts worldviews.
  • use technology in order to communicate with individuals and access resources from other cultures.
  • are familiar with existing cultural norms of new technology environments (instant messaging, virtual workspaces, e-mail), and are able to interact successfully in such environments.  


Continuum of Progress:

Indicator
Novice
Basic
Proficient
Advanced
Awareness of culture
Student is largely ignorant of specific value systems that contribute to the way that he / she and others behave, OR he/she possesses negative, stereotyped beliefs about different cultural groups.  
Student is aware that culture impacts his / her own behavior and the behavior of others; however, understanding of specific beliefs and value systems is largely superficial or incomplete. 
Student possesses some knowledge of specific beliefs, values, and sensibilities that contribute to the way that he / she and others behave. 
Student is highly knowledgeable about specific cultural beliefs, values, and sensibilities that might affect the way that he / she and others think or behave. 
Awareness of history and its impact
Student is largely unknowledgeable about the history of his own and others’ cultures, and he/she shows no interest in learning more. 
Student possesses basic knowledge about history, mostly focused on mainstream American cultures. He / she is largely unaware of how history has shaped relationships among diverse groups. 
Student knows some history of mainstream and non-mainstream American cultures, and of other nations; he / she understands that these histories impact relationships today, but this understanding is unsophisticated.  
Student has substantial knowledge of history of both mainstream and non-mainstream American cultures, and the history of other nations.  He / she has a sophisticated  understanding of how these histories have impacted relationships among groups.  
Perspective taking - history
Student does not realize that knowledge of history is socially and politically constructed; when learning about history, does not independently assume the perspective of non-mainstream groups. 
Student requires substantial assistance to recognize that knowledge of history is socially constructed, and to assume the perspective of non-mainstream groups when learning history.
Student realizes that history is socially constructed.  With minimal guidance, he / she is able to take the perspective of non-mainstream groups when learning about historical events. 
Student realizes that history is socially and politically constructed, and has sufficient knowledge to spontaneously take the perspective of non-mainstream groups when learning history. 
Stereotyping and bias
Student does not understand that stereotyping and other biases are not acceptable, and tends to engage in these behaviors.  Student internalizes implicit, biased messages about other cultural groups (e.g., in media). 
At a general level, student understands that stereotyping and other biases are not acceptable; however, he/she is not sensitive to the impact of prejudice or to biased messages about other cultural groups (e.g., in media). 
Student understands the dangers of stereotyping and other biases; he/she is aware of and sensitive to issues of racism and prejudice, and sometimes recognizes biased messages about other cultural groups (e.g., in media). 
Student understands the dangers of stereotyping and other biases, is sensitive to issues of racism and prejudice, and highly cognizant of biased messages about other cultural groups (e.g., within media). 
Tolerance
Student fails to recognize similarities between his/her own culture and other cultures; he/she judges differences in behavior or lifestyle negatively, and does not associate with individuals from different cultural groups.
With a few exceptions, student fails to recognize similarities between his/her own culture and other cultures.  Although not negative about differences in behavior or lifestyle, student only occasionally associates with individuals from different cultures.
With guidance, student is cognizant of similarities between his/her own culture and other cultures.    He/she appreciates and accepts individuals with diverse beliefs, appearances, and lifestyles.
Student understands that individuals from diverse cultures share some fundamental beliefs; he/she appreciates and accepts diversity, and seeks opportunities to learn about and interact with different cultures.
Language proficiency
Student is not interested in learning other languages.  Efforts made towards these skills are superficial and motivated almost entirely by course requirements. 
Student is willing to learn another language, but does not appreciate the value of this skill.  Although student makes a genuine attempt to learn a new language, these efforts are motivated by course requirements. 
Student understands the value of being multilingual, is at or working towards this proficiency, and is intrinsically motivated to acquire new languages. 
Student understands the value of being multilingual, is at or working towards this proficiency, and is intrinsically motivated to learn not only a new language, but also about the culture from which the language is derived.
Interactions with individuals from different cultures
Student communicates, interacts, or works poorly with individuals from other cultural groups.
Under supervision, student can generally communicate, interact, and work positively with individuals from other cultural groups.
Student usually communicates, interacts, and works positively with individuals from other cultural groups.
Student almost always communicates, interacts, and works positively with individuals from other cultural groups; he/she seeks opportunities to learn from diverse perspectives.
Use of resources from different cultures
Student avoids using technology to gain access to individuals or resources from other cultures.
With substantial guidance, student is willing to use technology to gain access to individuals or resources from other cultures; however, these efforts are generally motivated by course requirements.
Student sometimes uses technology to gain access to individuals or resources from other cultures; these efforts are sometimes self-initiated and intrinsically motivated.
Student regularly uses technology to gain access to individuals or resources from other cultures; these efforts are generally motivated by interest and exceed course requirements.
Awareness of the way that  technology influences worldviews

Student does not understand that technology impacts his/her own and others’ worldviews.
Student understands that technology allows access to other cultures, but does not understand the impact of this access on worldviews or societies.
Student has some understanding of the way technology impacts his/her own and others’ worldviews.
Student has an insightful understanding of the way technology impacts his/her own and others’ worldviews (e.g., by allowing individuals to access pop culture, news, ideas, from other societies).
Culture of technological environments
Student has no knowledge about the culture of technological environments (e.g., online chats, instant messaging, MOOs, MUDs), and, does not participate in these forums.
Student has some basic knowledge about the culture of technological environments (e.g., online chats, instant messaging, MOOs, MUDs), and participates minimally in these forums.
Student is reasonably fluent in the culture of technological environments (e.g., online chats, instant messaging, MOOs, MUDs), and can participate frequently in these forums.
Student has substantial and sophisticated knowledge about the culture of technological environments (e.g., online chats, instant messaging, MOOs, MUDs), and can participate fully in these forums.


References and Links:

Arvizu, S. and Saravia-Shore, M.  (1990). Cross-Cultural Literacy, An Anthropological Approach to Dealing with Diversity.  Education and Urban Society, 22(4), pgs. 364-376.

Banks, J. A., Cookson, P., Gay, G, Hawley, W., Irvine, J. J., Nieto, S., Schofield, J. W., and  Stephan, W. G. (2001).  Diversity within Unity.  Essential Principles for Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Society [Online]. Available: http://depts.washington.edu/coe/news/DiversityUnity.pdf

Beaupre, B.  (2000). Blending Cultural, Academic, and Technological Communication:  Literacy for the New Millennium.  ED 441234 [Online]. Available: http://ed.gov.databases/ERIC_Digests/ed441234.html

Brandt, Ron (1994).  On Educating for Diversity: A Conversation with James A. Banks. Educational Leadership, 51(8), pgs. 28-31

Burnette, J (1999).  Critical Behaviors and Strategies for Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.  ED 435147 [Online]. Available: http://ed.gov.databases/ERIC_Digests/ed435147.html

Anicich, M. and Kirk, R.  (1999). Cultural Awareness Education in Early Childhood Education.  ED 433928 [Online]. Available: http://ed.gov.databases/ERIC_Digests/ed433928.html

Gay, Geneva (1994).  A Synthesis of Scholarship in Multicultural Education.  Urban Education Monograph Series.  NCREL. [Online]. Available:  www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/leadrshp/le0gay.htm

Gura, Mark (1994).  The Human Mosaic Project.  Educational Leadership, 51(8), pgs. 40-1

Hirsch, E. D. (1987).  Cultural Literacy:  What Every American Needs to Know.  Boston: Houghton Miffin

Janzen, Rod (1994).  Melting Pot or Mosaic.  Educational Leadership, 51(8), pgs. 9-11

Ladson-Billings, Gloria (1994).  What We Can Learn From Multicultural Education Research.  Educational Leadership, 51(8), pgs. 22-26

Parkinson, W. and Saunders, S. (1999).   Cultural Literacy and Languages:  Enabling Students to Learn to Live Together.  ED 449058

Petropoulou, Z.  (1992). Cross-Cultural Awareness in Teaching Business French Courses in an Academic Environment:  Problems and Difficulties. ED357599

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